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Handmade Luxury


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Handmade Luxury


Etkie is a social enterprise that provides financial stability for wildly talented Native American artisans through the design of luxury accessories. In partnership with Kiva, Etkie provides micro-finance loans for women to purchase high-end materials and serves as a cohesive branding, marketing and distribution platform.

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Where We Work


The chapter, also know as the Cañoncito Band of Navajos, is located roughly 35 miles from Albuquerque. The chapter claimed 1,649 members during the 2000 census, and approximately 70 percent of the Tohajiilee adult population is unemployed.   

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Where We Work


The chapter, also know as the Cañoncito Band of Navajos, is located roughly 35 miles from Albuquerque. The chapter claimed 1,649 members during the 2000 census, and approximately 70 percent of the Tohajiilee adult population is unemployed.   

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Making A Direct Impact

Our objective is to improve the economic status of Native American artisan women through hands on training and support. We engage with our artists and work with them as little or as much as they deem necessary. Our relationships are built over a long period of time and we cater our support and training based on what each woman identifies as a barrier to change and self-efficacy. 

We immediately improve their economic status by offering fair wages based on a culmination of industry standards and state labor regulations. Exposure to a larger market under the Etkie brand improves the artists’ production capacities to create a reliable income. While our financial impact is helpful, it is boosted by other services that include helping set priorities, organizing transportation, or assisting with basic issues such as finding healthcare providers and scheduling doctors’ appointments. Providing an atmosphere that promotes integrity, respect, and individual growth, the Etkie team strives to enable artisans to make a living despite a lack of opportunity and gain confidence and independence to achieve their goals.   

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Meet the Artists


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Meet the Artists


Meet Priscilla

Priscilla is the mastermind behind our Lacey and Drew patterns. She has three boys and works part-time taking care of elderly patients with the reservations home care program. She taught both Dru and her daughter Valeen how to bead. She has a very quick sense of humor and enjoys spending time with her family. 

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Meet Dorothy

Dorothy has beaded all of her professional life. For ten years she worked for a woman creating beaded embellishments for leather goods. Each piece averaged earning about $3 an hour. Working with Etkie she earns between 8-13$/hr and is able to put money in her savings account 

Meet Dru

Dru is Etkie's lead beader and designer. She grew up on the Tohajiilee reservation and learned to bead when she was 15. Her favorite moments are spent outdoors with her family and seeing new places. Her beadwork has been featured in Paris, Berlin and San Francisco.  

Meet Naomi 

Naomi is the artist and inspiration behind one of our best sellers, the Naomi pattern. She is the proud mom of a three year old son. When not beading, she attends classes to finish her diploma so she can apply for college to become a paramedic. 

 

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The Story


If one footstep can begin a lifelong journey, so too can a single piece of jewelry. A new jewelry company called Etkie, created a collection of hand-beaded bracelets and earrings that are the start of such a journey for several women in New Mexico. 

-Indian Country Today 

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The Story


If one footstep can begin a lifelong journey, so too can a single piece of jewelry. A new jewelry company called Etkie, created a collection of hand-beaded bracelets and earrings that are the start of such a journey for several women in New Mexico. 

-Indian Country Today 

   

 

 

After embarking on many adventures and collecting wearable treasures from artisans around the world, both Sydney and Kerry knew that some of the most unique and culturally important jewelry could be found in their own backyard. Kerry raised her daughter Sydney in rural New Mexico, and instilled her with an appreciation for the landscape, art, and cultural heritage of the Southwest. In 2013, they created Etkie, a social enterprise dedicated to producing high quality jewelry and accessories in their home state of New Mexico.